2018 Educational Conference Schedule, Course Descriptions and Instructor Bios

List of Conference Courses By Number

2901: INTOXICATED LEADERSHIP: HOW TO AVOID LEADING UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF YOUR EMOTIONS (one day)
2902/2912:  LEADER OR BYSTANDER (1/2 Day)
2903: MANAGING THE FIRE GROUND – A FIRESIDE DISCUSSION (one day)
2904: TRAINING OFFICER (½ day)
2914: MAXIMIZE YOUR TRAINING BUDGET (½ day) - JIBC
2905/2915: FIREGROUND OPERATIONS FOR TODAY’S FLOW PATH (½ day)
2906/2916  RESIDENTIAL SEARCH | FORCIBLE ENTRY (½ day)
2907/2917: THERMAL IMAGING CAMERAS (½ day)
2908: CONFINED SPACE RESCUE - OPERATIONS (two days)
3001: FLAT ROOF FIRES (one day)
3002/3102: CLOSING THE TACTICAL GAP – The Role of Strike Team/Task Force Leaders and Division Supervisors in the WUI (½ day)
3012/3101: ELEVATOR RESCUE (½ day) – Apex Elevator
3013: RESPONDING TO NATURAL GAS EMERGENCIES (½ day)
3004/3014: SCBA AIR MANAGEMENT (½ day)
3005: AIR MONITORING & DETECTION (one day)
3006: INCIDENT SAFETY OFFICER – TECHNICAL RESCUE NFPA 1521 (two days)
3103: TOO HOT FOR TOTS! (½ day)
3104: NALOXONE TRAIN THE TRAINER (½ day)
 

Link to H.O.T. Weekend Schedule, COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AND INSTRUCTOR BIOS

Course Dates, Times and Course Descriptions

0830 to 1630

2901: INTOXICATED LEADERSHIP: HOW TO AVOID LEADING UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF YOUR EMOTIONS (one day)

Date:  Monday, May 29, 2018

Instructor:  Benjamin Marton

Traditional leadership classes often trick us into thinking that we can resolve conflict in a ten-minute conversation. In reality, leaders may never be able to secure a buy-in from the employee.  Intoxicated Leadership illustrates why the body responds to conflict the way it does, be it on the fireground or in the firehouse.  Using this information, we will discuss at length how leaders can create favorable circumstances to assist in constructing and having a difficult conversation.  Participants will receive an overview of emotional intelligence, and real-world tips that can be applied immediately to assist leaders in having easier and ultimately more productive conversations.

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0830 to 1200

OR

1300 to 1630

2902/2912:  LEADER OR BYSTANDER (1/2 Day)

Date:  Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Instructor:  Les Karpluk

This program is designed to be blunt and honest about taking leadership seriously and impacting the Fire Department for the better.

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0830 to 1630

2903: MANAGING THE FIRE GROUND – A FIRESIDE DISCUSSION (one day)


Date:  Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Instructor:  Wayne Humphries AND Randy Hebenton

This Fireside Chat is a highly interactive discussion revolving around the all-important Command Decisions that must be made in the first few minutes on scene of a structure fire.  Included are the critical issues of size-up, risk analysis, fire behaviour, smoke conditions, building construction, and strategic & tactical decision making.  With an understanding of these critical issues we’ll look at the considerations in developing an effective incident action plan that will address firefighter safety as well as achieving effective incident stabilization. These discussions will challenge your assumptions about the role of the IC – what it is, the responsibilities, and how to carry out the function. These interactive discussions will also engage in the misunderstandings around the standards and requirements for a RIT and the associated training required to fulfill that role.  Having attended the recent UL PPV study in Chicago, the discussions will also attempt to clear up some of the mystique around the strategic goal of “ventilation”, allowing the participants to gain a better and more thorough understanding of the tactical objective of positive pressure ventilation – PPV, along with an appreciation and understanding of some helpful teaching processes.

Wayne Humphry is a 39-year veteran of the fire service, Wayne retired from the Vancouver Fire & Rescue Services after a 31-year career serving in fire suppression as Lieutenant, Captain and Battalion Chief.  He also worked extensively with Vancouver Fire’s training division as an Instructor, Training Officer and Division Chief.  Based on his work in both roles he has extensive experience in fire rescue emergency operations, specialty teams, training and development, facilitation, and project creation and management.  He is passionate about building superior expertise amongst the fire service and fire officers in particular; a hands-on fire and rescue practitioner; an experienced trainer and facilitator, he pursues his goals with energy and determination. Since the introduction of positive pressure ventilation fans to the Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services (approx. 1990), Wayne has been passionately involved with developing an understanding of this new approach to the strategic goal of Ventilation along with the implementation of the tactical techniques of Positive Pressure Ventilation (PPV); and continues to share these years of expertise with many other fire departments. Wayne has developed in-house Officer Development seminars including ProBoard accredited programs for various career fire departments throughout the province. He is also very active in working with volunteer/POC departments and regional districts, enhancing the skills of officers and firefighters in rural areas with customized, locally delivered training and education. His subject expertise includes Fire Officer Level 1, 2 and 3 programs – Emergency Incident Management (BCERMS/ICS, Command Post operations, fire behaviour, strategies and tactics, communications and personnel accountability); Fire Service Instructor; Incident Safety Officer; Rapid Intervention Teams; and Live Fire Exercises Levels 1, 2 & 3. In addition to many career and paid-on-call departments throughout BC, he has also recently delivered emergency incident management and strategies & tactics training to the Calgary Fire Department in Alberta, and Winnipeg Fire Department in Manitoba. Wayne is a member of the Retired Fire Chiefs Association of BC.

Randy Hebenton is a 39-year veteran of the fire service. Randy retired from the Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services after a 35-year career serving as a Battalion Chief after many years as a Lieutenant, Captain and Training Officer.  He has worked extensively with training for the department in the New Recruit program, Company Officer and Battalion Chief training programs as well as other specialty disciplines.  Randy is a lead instructor for FireWorks Consulting Inc. and has also been an adjunct instructor with the Justice Institute of BC in their Fire Officer Development, Strategies & Tactics, Live Fire and RIT programs. Randy has instructed for many other fire departments throughout British Columbia, Alberta and Manitoba, along with conducting training for Firefighters & Fire Officers from Saudi Arabia as well as coaching emergency planners from China.  He has also served on the VFR&S recruitment panel conducting interviews for career applicants.

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0830 to 1200

2904: TRAINING OFFICER (½ day)

Date:  Tuesday, May 29,2018

Instructor:  BCFTOA Executive

This session is being facilitated by the BCFTOA Executive.  It is designed to assist new Training Officer’s begin their new role.

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1300 to 1630

2914: MAXIMIZE YOUR TRAINING BUDGET (½ day) - JIBC

Date:  Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Instructor:  TBD

Fire Departments training budgets are constantly being fiscally challenged and Fire Chiefs are always looking for innovative ways to cut costs while maximizing their training potential.
This presentation will identify how fire departments commonly deliver their training as well as explore innovative strategies that will enable you to reduce your spending while still being able to deliver regular noncertified training as well as JIBC accredited training.

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0830 to 1200

2905/2915: FIREGROUND OPERATIONS FOR TODAY’S FLOW PATH (½ day)

Date:  Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Instructor:  Jeff Seaton

Jeff Seaton has been a professional member and student of the fire service for over 26 years in the United States and Canada.  Jeff is the Assistant Chief of the UC Davis Fire Department, formerly with City of San Jose and District of North Vancouver Fire Departments; in 2016 he received the Ed Bent Award as the Fire Service Instructor of the Year for the state of California. Jeff is a California Certified Fire Officer in California and Fire Officer 2 in British Columbia.  He has instructed at multiple Firehouse Shows, FDIC, BCFTOA Symposiums, Fire Nuggets and International training symposiums.  In 2008 he traveled to Vietnam to review their current fire ground operations, training, tools and equipment and to make recommendations towards improving their Fire Service.  He possesses a B.A. in Physical Education and is a former ISFSI Western Regional Director. The three most precious things in life to him are his wife Jessica, his son Joshua and his daughter Mia.

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0830 to 1200

AND/OR

1300 to 1630

2906/2916  RESIDENTIAL SEARCH (Josh Calista) | FORCIBLE ENTRY (Glen McGuire) (½ day)

Date:  Tuesday, May 29, 2018

2906:  RESIDENTIAL SEARCH, Facilitated by Josh Calista
2916:  FORCIBLE ENTRY (½ day combined), Facilitated by Glen McGuire

RESIDENTIAL SEARCH: Life Safety & civilian Rescue are consistently touted as a priority at every fire incident. How often have our Firefighters actually tested their proficiency at searching, locating, and removing occupants from buildings under adverse conditions? The interactive session will encourage discussion on the topics of: Oriented Search and the often misunderstood or mis-applied tactic of VES (Vent, Enter, Search). In the event that a civilian victim is located and must be removed from the building, we will offer techniques to efficiently perform the Rescue operation. This class will challenge participants to match expectations with reality, creating a more efficient and effective search firefighter.

FORCIBLE ENTRY: The ability to gain entry into an emergency scene quickly, in a manner that saves the owner time and money when the incident is over, is a skill that brings Fire Department’s a great deal of public favor. Knowing when, where, and how to open a vertical surface is a skill that needs constant honing and attention. This interactive class will discuss the basic concepts of tool safety, tool choice, and entry techniques. Firefighters will have to continue to practice and review the information given to stay on top of this skill.

Josh Calista Josh has worked for the West Sacramento Fire Department for 15 years. As a Training Officer, and continuous student of the Fire Service, he has been fortunate to exchange information on the topics of Engine and Truck Company Operations, Firefighter Survival, Rapid Intervention, and Thermal Imaging Cameras. Josh participated on the committee to develop a Firefighter Survival and Rapid Intervention curriculum for the State of California. He is an Instructor at the Regional Fire Academy and a member of the Sacramento USAR Team (CA TF-7). Josh received a Bachelor’s Degree from the University of San Diego.

Glen McGuire started his career in the fire service back in 1982 with the Half Moon Bay FPD, a small two station paid / volunteer department. His last few years he had promoted to CA and was the assistant T/O for his shift. In 1991 he joined the San Jose FD and in1996 was promoted to the position of Captain. Since that time he has been involved in many forms of training. Glen was the departments lead instructor for FF Survival, RIC Operations, and Forcible Entry. He also assisted with Search and Rescue, Hose Ops, and Thermal imagining training. Glen recently retired from the SJFD in Nov. of 2015. Glen is also a founding member of the Nobody Gets Left behind training group (NGLB). NGLB has been providing training classes for the Fire Service throughout the United States and Canada for many years.

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0830 to 1200

OR

1300 to 1630

2907/2917: THERMAL IMAGING CAMERAS (½ day)

Date:  Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Instructor:  Jake Pelk

Thermal Imaging Cameras (TIC) have been in the Fire Service for over 30 years, yet many in today’s fire service have limited exposure to techniques that can be integrated into everyday use at the Firehouse.  This awareness course is designed to assist all members of engine and truck companies that may use thermal imagers. The course emphasizes the use of good scanning techniques including the various skills needed for safe operations.  We will explore TIC Operations and leave the student with a solid understanding of strengths and weakness of this valuable tool.

Jake Pelk has been in the fire service for over twenty years. Jake started his career as a volunteer in Boulder Creek, CA in 1992 and was promoted to Fire Captain in 2009 at Central County Fire Department in San Mateo County. The Central County Fire Dept. protects the Cities of Burlingame, Milbrae and the Town of Hillsborough. In 2010 Jake was assigned to the Central San Mateo County Training Division on a 40-hour week. The Division serves Foster City, San Mateo, Central County, Millbrae and San Bruno.  Jake has been very active in the development and implementation of the San Mateo County RIC policy. He served as a Co-Chair for the RIC/FF Survival subcommittee for the California State Fire Training re-write and is also a LARRO instructor. He began teaching thermal imaging classes in 1998. He co-founded the ‘Nobody Gets Left Behind’ Training Group and is currently the Director. In November of 2010, the California Training Officers honoured Jake with the “Ed Bent” Award (California Instructor of the Year). Seeing the need to innovate, Jake started a new venture in 2014 called WolfPack Solutions to assist Fire Service professionals with their tech needs. Jake has served as the 2nd Vice President for the Cal Chiefs Northern California Training Section and currently the Area 7 Director. Jake is also serving as a FEMA Search Team Manager (California Task Force 3), Husband, and most importantly, father of two girls (EvaMarie and Mary Klaire).

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0830 to 1630

2908: CONFINED SPACE RESCUE - OPERATIONS (two days)

Date:  Tuesday, May 29 AND Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Instructor:  Dynamic Rescue

Confined space rescue is a subset of technical rescue operations that involves the rescue and recovery of victims trapped in a confined space or in a place only accessible through confined spaces, such as underground vaults, storage silos, storage tanks, or sewers. Confined space rescues can be technically challenging due to the environment in which they occur. Confined spaces are often narrow and constricting preventing easy access by rescuers. They are usually either unlit or poorly lit so rescuers must provide their own light source. Finally, confined spaces often contain unknown hazardous materials in liquid or gas form which can be harmful or fatal to humans. These hazards can be fatal as they create a limited window in which to perform a rescue. The general rule is that without oxygen, a person in a confined space will likely suffer asphyxia resulting in either brain damage or death. The urgent need to rescue someone from a confined space often leads to ill-prepared rescue attempts. Two-thirds of all of deaths occurring in confined spaces are attributed to persons attempting to rescue someone else.

The Operations level includes team-building working towards a systematic approach to Confined Space Rescue. Participants will gain the skills and knowledge to conduct rope-based rescue operations in a variety of confined space environments. Rope based rescue systems will be utilized emphasizing the selection, construction, and proper use of these systems in the industrial environment. Students will gain practical experience in the use of communication systems, resource material, patient packaging devices, atmospheric monitoring equipment, air sampling strategies, and strategies/tactics for successful emergency entry operations. Participants will operate as an integral part of a team environment and will be directed and
monitored by instructors acting as team leaders. Students are given written, individual proficiency
and practical evaluations. This course meets or exceeds NFPA 1006 and 1670 and is in
conformance with CSA and WorkSafeBC Standards.

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0830 to 1630

3001: FLAT ROOF FIRES (one day)

Date:  Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Instructor:  John Macdonald

Flat Roof Fires in Type 5 apartment buildings:
The course will include a video presentation based on apartment fires attended by Captain Macdonald. The presentation also highlight building construction, fire behavior in the roof space tactics for fighting apartment fires, reading smoke and limiting water damage. The presentation also includes discussions on:
• Tools required
• Operational Guidelines
• Dimensional lumber vs. engineered joist (TGI); Modern vs. Legacy Structures
• Modern Fire Suppression systems pertaining to NFPA 13 and 13R
• Studies related to this topic
• Review of recent NIST and UL material that supports the information
• Supporting building occupants
• Salvage and overhaul

John Macdonald has been a Coquitlam Firefighter for the past 24 years.  He was promoted to Assistant Chief in January 2018 and spent 4 years as a Field Trainer. In 2016 he received the BCFTOA “Trainer of the Year” award. He is currently working as a Captain in Suppression. John attended Simon Fraser University obtaining his Bachelor of Arts Degree while playing five seasons of Clansmen Football.  In 2011 he obtained his Master’s Degree in Disaster and Emergency Management from Royal Roads University and has recently finished his Fire Officer Certificate (FO 1, 2, 3 and 4). He is also certified to instruct and evaluate Structural Collapse Level 1 and 2, Fire Service Instructor 1 and SPP-WFF 1 (Wild land Firefighting). John has recently written an article for Fire Engineering Magazine (March 2016) titled “Flat Roof Fires in 3-6 Story Apartment Buildings”. His interest in this subject, stems from actual experience gained at several major fires that occurred in the City of Coquitlam over the past several years.

Areas of interest include development of High Rise, Auto Extrication, First Responder, Recruit and Auxiliary/Volunteer training programs.

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0830 to 1200

OR

1300 to 1630

3002/3102: CLOSING THE TACTICAL GAP – The Role of Strike Team/Task Force Leaders and Division Supervisors in the WUI (½ day)

Date:  Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Instructor:  Darren Lee and Chad Gartrell

Incident Commanders cannot safely and effectively manage large dynamic WUI events on their own. In order to maintain command and control they must decentralize their command. How do we organize our resources to best meet the challenges of a WUI event? How do we ensure that those same resources are provided the leadership required to maximize safety and effectiveness?

Informed and empowered subordinate leaders "Tactical Bosses" lead from the front, maintain situational awareness, anticipate operational needs and act decisively. Tactical Bosses lead up and down the chain of command, communicating with other leaders and the Incident Commander. They foster a spirit of cooperation between municipal firefighters and wildland firefighters that brings out the best in all of us.

Based on practical experience that is backed by the latest NWCG S215 Curriculum; Learners will be exposed to best practices for establishing decentralized leadership within a WUI incident. This brief program will utilize case studies, group activities and guest speakers. Learners will develop key takeaways for their own organization. The intent is to stimulate conversation as to how the municipal fire service can better train, prepare and organize for WUI incidents. The following key learning areas will be covered:
• Organization and Deployment
• Incident Action Plans and Operational Briefings
• Triage and Structure Protection
• Strategies and Tactics
• The First Operational Period

Darren Lee has been a student of the fire service for over 24 years. He began his career as a paid-on-call in North Cowichan, worked in Surrey for over 10 years before he moved to assume a training officer role with West Kelowna in 2007. Darren has had a keen interest in WUI operations throughout his career. He has been fortunate enough to be exposed to excellent Wildland training, WUI training and operational experiences throughout Canada and the United States. As a command officer with West Kelowna Fire Rescue; Darren continues to gain operational experience in the Wildland and WUI disciplines. Working in the Okanagan has provided him the opportunity to work on several notable WUI incidents and serve with amazing firefighters from the municipal and wildland communities. Darren is a BlueCard Incident Command Instructor and works as an Adjunct Instructor for the COTR and JIBC.

Chad Gartrell – Bio under 2605: RESCUE OPERATIONS FOR THE FIRST DUE ENGINE – NGLB

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0830 to 1630

3012/3101: ELEVATOR RESCUE (½ day) – Apex Elevator

Dates:  Wednesday, May 30, 2018 OR Thursday, May 31, 2018

Instructor:  Glenn Zolnierczyk

This course aims to provide information for Fire Fighting Professionals to conduct safe and successful rescues of people trapped in elevators. The course also includes classroom training for Automatic Emergency Recall and the use of Elevators by Fire Fighters in accordance with the most recent edition of the B44 Safety Code for Elevators. Codes have changed dramatically in the last few years, and this course will bring fire fighters up to date.

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0830 to 1200

3003: ELECTRICAL SAFETY (½ day) – BC Hydro

Date:  Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Instructor:  Mark Spencer

What you'll learn: As a first responder, you often find yourself facing electrical hazards in emergency situations. Our free online electrical safety training will help you evaluate risks and make decisions to keep yourself and the public safe.
• The basics of how electricity behaves
• How to spot overhead and underground hazards
• Safe distances and the risks of stepping and touching
• What to do if equipment has contacted a power line
• What to do if there is a downed power line
• How to move people out of areas energized by a downed power line
• For firefighters: Additional electrical safety training to address electrical hazards faced when using equipment

What you'll receive: Certificate of completion for taking BC Hydro's electrical safety training for first responders. For firefighters, an additional certificate for taking the supplemental BC Hydro's electrical safety training for fire fighters.

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1300 to 1630

3013: RESPONDING TO NATURAL GAS EMERGENCIES (½ day)

Date:  Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Instructor:  Fortis BC – Facilitated by Ian Banfield

These programs meet the requirements outlined in the British Columbia Fire Service Minimum Training Standards – Structure Firefighters Competency and Training Playbook.The programs include videos and discussion guides that support facilitators teaching first responders about the basic properties of electricity and natural gas, and how to approach emergency situations safely. Responding to Natural Gas Emergencies is a course we created in partnership with the Canadian Gas Association and Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs, to provide safety information for first responders. This course will be provided to all fire training officers upon request. It includes a discussion of the properties and behavior of natural gas and how it’s distributed, as well as interactive sessions using video scenarios of emergency response situations and procedures.

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0830 to 1200

OR

1300 to 1630

3004/3014: SCBA AIR MANAGEMENT (½ day)

Date:  Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Instructors:  Chris Geiger

This ½ day introductory program will discuss factors that affect air management, the Rule of Air Management (ROAM), Work/Rest cycles, emergency air conservation, and air management for RIT. It will conclude with a discussion on training priorities and implementation techniques for Training Officers.
Chris Geiger has more than 10 years in the Fire Service and currently serves as Captain with Ladysmith Fire/Rescue, a Paid-on-Call department on Vancouver Island.

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0830 to 1630

3005: AIR MONITORING & DETECTION (one day)

Date:  Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Instructor:   Scott Philp

The course will focus on monitoring and detection and the importance of truly understanding how detectors (primarily the 4 gas and PID) function, determining correction factors based on the calibration gases that are being used, and when and how to apply them to your response. The goal is to increase understanding across fire services and industry, when it comes to this field as there is a great deal of crossover between Hazmat and confined space rescue with respect to air monitoring.

Scott Philp is a retired Acting Battalion/Captain from Delta Fire Rescue Services after 33+ years of service. Being an Acting Training Officer in the department, he was seconded from the floor to oversee the development of Delta’s Hazardous Materials Response Team in 2004. He functioned in a lead role in this specialty, until retirement. During this time, as requested by Delta Fire, he also became an instructor with the JIBC, focusing on NFPA 472 delivery of Awareness, Operations, and primarily Technician, so as to aid in the delivery of these courses “in House”. He is also an instructor with the Fire Officer program, instructing ‘Emergency Scene Management’, as well as, ‘Strategies and Tactics’.  He currently travels coast to coast delivering Hazmat courses, with a focus on monitoring and detection.

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0830 to 1630 (Wed)

AND

0830 to 1200 (Thur)

3006: INCIDENT SAFETY OFFICER – TECHNICAL RESCUE NFPA 1521 (two days)

Date:  Wednesday, May 30 AND Thursday, May 31, 2018

Instructor:  VIERA – Facilitated by Dan Murphy

The fire service has evolved from a service that responds only to fires to a service that provides rescue and resources for just about every crisis imaginable. If we’re going to provide technical rescue services in our communities, we must first provide our safety and chief officers with the proper training and resources to successfully mitigate any safety issues on these calls.

Prerequisite: NFPA 1021 Fire Officer 1 (to receive certification and to be registered on the National Pro Board Registry)

Objectives: By the end of this session, the learners will be able to understand:

• Contributing factors to early injury and death
• Hazard identification
• Manage the transfer of ISO duties
• ICS
• Monitor the IAP, conditions and operations
• Monitor the accountability system
• Critical decision-making
• Determine the need for technical rescue ISO
• Identify technical rescue resources needed
• Risk management principles

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0830 to 1200

3103: TOO HOT FOR TOTS! (½ day)

Date:  Thursday, May 31, 2018

Instructor:  Frances MacDougall

Too Hot for Tots! is an evidence based, early childhood injury prevention program. This workshop is geared to Early Childhood Educators who work with families with children aged 0-6.

During this 3-hour workshop front-line educators will:
• Learn about the common cause of burns and scalds in the home.
• Receive a Too Hot For Tots! Tool kit containing educator and caregiver resources for their centre.
• Receive instruction on how to implement Too Hot for Tots! Program in their community setting.
• Receive a professional development certificate upon course completion.

Frances MacDougall is a registered nurse and mother.  After working on the Burn Unit at BC Children’s Hospital for over 18 years and hearing parents and caregivers say they were not aware of the burn hazards in their home or how seriously their child could be injured, Frances developed the Too Hot for Tots! Program.  Over the past two decades, Frances has presented at local, national and international conferences sharing her unique knowledge and understanding of this issue with parents, educators and special interest groups.

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0830 to 1200

3104: NALOXONE TRAIN THE TRAINER (½ day)

Date:  Thursday, May 31, 2018

Instructor: BC Emergency Health Services (BCEHS) – Facilitated by Anna Chayba

To provide guidance and direction for firefighter first responder trainers on the delivery and administration of Naloxone to patients with suspected or confirmed opioid overdose.  Discussion will also include updates to BCEHS Spinal Guidelines. 
Anna Chayba is an Education Officer/Advanced Care Paramedic with BCEHS

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Become a Member

The British Columbia Fire Training Officers Association, more commonly referred as the BCFTOA, is dedicated to gathering information on training standards and providing this information to fire departments so they may effectively and safely train their members. In a world of ever changing standards and regulations, this organization provides fire departments with the most current, up-to-date course information and training requirements.  The BCFTOA will help develop, and support the work of those leaders and organizations in order that they may best provide training for members and affiliated Associations.
 

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